October 25, 2014 5:22 PM ET

Construction Materials

Company Overview of CEMEX, Inc.

Company Overview

CEMEX, Inc. produces, markets, and exports building materials in the United States. It offers bulk and bagged cement; ready mixed concrete products; aggregates, including crushed stone and manufactured sand, gravel, sand, and recycled concrete; fly ash and other coal combustion products; special concrete pipes and precast concrete products; and related concrete products, including concrete blocks, architectural products, gypsum, landscaping products, and asphalt products. CEMEX, Inc. was formerly known as Southdown, Inc. and changed its name to CEMEX, Inc. in February 2001. The company was incorporated in 1930 and is based in Houston, Texas. It has cement plants, distribution terminals, aggr...

840 Gessner

Suite 1400

Houston, TX 77024

United States

Founded in 1930

4,100 Employees

Phone:

713-650-6200

Fax:

713-653-6815

Key Executives for CEMEX, Inc.

Chief Executive Officer
Age: 66
Chief Operating Officer
Age: 64
Regional President of California & Pacific Northwest Region
Age: 53
President of South America & Caribbean Region
Age: 57
President of CEMEX USA
Age: 49
Compensation as of Fiscal Year 2014.

CEMEX, Inc. Key Developments

CEMEX, Inc. Liable for Some Rio Grande Arsenic Pollution

CEMEX, Inc. is responsible for part of the arsenic contamination of the Rio Grande in the vicinity of the International Boundary and Water Commission in West El Paso, according to a federal court judgment in a lawsuit that Asarco, LLC filed against CEMEX. U.S. District Judge Phil Martinez issued his final judgment on March 31, and ordered CEMEX Inc. to pay Asarco $1.1 million as its part of the cleanup costs. The former cement plant on property owned by CEMEX, at West Paisano Drive and Executive Center Boulevard, contributed to a release of arsenic that led to partial contamination of a section of the river, according to the judge's 71-page opinion. The lawsuit against CEMEX Inc. also helped to unravel the convoluted record of the CEMEX site's historical owners and operators in West El Paso.

Court to Rule on Asarco's Federal Lawsuit Seeking Cleanup Costs from Cemex

Asarco and Cemex are waiting on a federal court to decide the outcome of Asarco's efforts to get Cemex to contribute to the cleanup costs of the U.S. International Boundary and Water Commission site in West El Paso. Asarco, which alleges that Cemex Inc. and Cemex Construction Materials South LLC caused part of the arsenic contamination at IBWC, is seeking $11 million from Cemex, about half of the cleanup costs that Asarco already had agreed to pay. Asarco alleges that the arsenic came from kiln dust on the Cemex property, which is west of the former Asarco copper smelter and north of West Paisano Drive, at Executive Center Boulevard and West Paisano. The IBWC site sits on West Paisano, south of the former Asarco smelter and slightly southeast of Cemex. The lawsuit alleges that contaminated material migrates in runoff through a culvert on the Cemex site, which runs under West Paisano and empties at the Rio Grande. Cemex denies that its property was the source of arsenic found at IBWC, and argues that arsenic found at Cemex may have come from Asarco's former smelter operations. Cemex also alleged that Asarco characterized the report as its 'smoking gun,' (although) the evidence showed that it was nothing more than a limited site assessment or look-see commissioned by (Stanley Jobe) when he thought he might want to purchase the property. Mr. Jobe had absolutely no duty whatsoever, legal or otherwise, to report any findings in the report to anyone, much less to a government agency. Jobe, an El Paso businessman, was required to testify but was not named as a defendant in the lawsuit. According to court documents presented by Asarco, one of the monitoring wells (EP-80) showed contamination that had to come from a source (Cemex) that is upstream from Asarco. Lawyers for the plaintiff argued that the arsenic had to come from historic and more recent rock-crushing, quarrying, mining, blasting and transportation operations on the Cemex property. Asarco alleged that Cemex and its predecessors in the cement plant and Toro Quarry area did not control the runoff from 1 million tons of cement kiln waste generated over 75 years. Asarco also alleged that the arsenic was allowed to run off and make its way into the Rio Grande. According to the court documents, the original cement plant at the Cemex site had provided cement for the construction of Elephant Butte Dam in Southern New Mexico. Hearings for the trial have ended. The judge is expected to render a decision soon.

Cemex, Inc. Agrees to Operate Advanced Pollution Controls on its Kiln and Pay a $1 Million Civil Penalty to Resolve Alleged Violations of the Clean Air Act

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency and the U.S. Department of Justice announced that CEMEX, Inc., the owner and operator of a Portland cement manufacturing facility in Lyons, Colo., has agreed to operate advanced pollution controls on its kiln and pay a $1 million civil penalty to resolve alleged violations of the Clean Air Act. This settlement will reduce harmful emissions of nitrogen oxides, which can have serious impacts on respiratory health for communities along Colorado's Front Range. The Department of Justice, on behalf of EPA, filed a complaint against CEMEX alleging that between 1997--2000, the company unlawfully made modifications at its Lyons plant that resulted in significant net increases of nitrogen oxide (NOx) and particulate matter (PM) emissions. The complaint further alleges that these increased emissions violated the CAA's Prevention of Significant Deterioration and Non-Attainment New Source Review requirements, which state that companies must obtain the necessary permits prior to making modifications at a facility and install and operate required pollution control equipment if modifications will result in increases of certain pollutants. As part of the settlement, CEMEX will install "Selective Non-Catalytic Reduction" (SNCR) technology at their Lyons facility, which is an advanced pollution control technology designed to reduce NOx emissions. This will reduce their NOx emissions by approximately 870 to 1,200 tons of NOx per year. The initial capital cost for installing SNCR is approximately $600,000 and the cost of injecting ammonia into the stack emissions stream, a necessary part of the process, is anticipated to be about $1.5 million per year. The settlement is part of EPA's national enforcement initiative to control harmful air pollution from the large sources of emissions, including Portland cement manufacturing facilities. The proposed consent decree will be lodged with the Federal District Court for the District of Colorado, and will be subject to a 30-day public comment period.

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